Security vs. Privacy: Telecoms & Apple

The first time I had thought about security and privacy beyond skimming the paranoid rustlings of people on internet forums was when a team and I won an AT&T case competition with the issue of using Big Data pitching an idea similar to something that the company actually rolled out within months of the end of the competition. Link to the Prezi we presented, names removed.

We were pretty proud of ourselves, generally ignoring our fellow peers when they made the case that the bulk of our idea was nothing less than an illusory tactic. The ones that tried to come up with cloud solutions and more technical advancements were especially miffed that what won that competition was essentially a huge marketing campaign, though as a marketing major, all I can really say about that is “well, they bought it.” Read More

Starting off November with a bang

Picture from the NYTimes article linked below

Drinking three glasses of champagne ‘could help prevent dementia and Alzheimer’s disease’
http://www.standard.co.uk/news/uk/drinking-three-glasses-of-champagne-every-day-can-help-prevent-alzheimers-disease-a3109626.html
The article has been amended to say that it’s three glasses of champagne a week, not a day! Which is good because I don’t think anyone was trying to push someone to expensive alcoholism in the pursuit of avoiding mental degradation. As someone with a grandmother with Alzheimer’s, and have a terrible memory in general, I feel like I should probably start drinking champagne just in case. Preventative measures and all. Read More

Poverty and Food Stamps

I found this interesting little chain of videos about the affects of poverty on the mind and food stamps. As someone whose family whose circumstances once warranted the use of food stamps, the amount of prejudice I’ve encountered over the years is staggering. My mother was pretty obviously not a welfare queen and there was no one waiting in those offices that even came close to the image that’s stuck in someone’s mind for a reason.

How Poverty Changes Your Brain:

How Food Stamps Work: 

What Living on Food Stamps is Really Like: 

At CIA Starbucks, even the baristas are covert

http://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/at-cia-starbucks-even-the-baristas-are-covert/2014/09/27/5a04cd28-43f5-11e4-9a15-137aa0153527_story.html

The hilarity when secrecy and customer service collide. I kind of want to work for the CIA Starbucks, not gonna lie.

If it weren’t in the middle of no where, being able to drink coffee with analyists and international go-betweens, intelligence experts, and cartographers practicing new languages and getting interviewed sounds just about ideal.

“The baristas go through rigorous interviews and background checks and need to be escorted by agency “minders” to leave their work area. There are no frequent-customer award cards, because officials fear the data stored on the cards could be mined by marketers and fall into the wrong hands, outing secret agents.”

Perhaps I’m just a sucker for a secret.

How to Fail

How to Fail

Forbes used a different title, but I like the one in the URL better.

Perhaps this article covers more than just trust in work and school and things we’re assigned to do. The author uses an anecdote of desert survival practice in the military. I don’t think it’s only the military that needs to be told they can still fail as a whole even when one of their guys comes out on top.

This is a video they included in the article. I’m at work right now, but I’m sure they included it for a reason. Be sure to check it out like i will later!