We have standards

We have standards

I’m always looking for new things to help my day along, especially because most methods seem to stop helping me after they lose their novelty. This is kind of cute, though it seems to still require a lot of will power. It’s more an organizational tool than a motivational one for sure. I’m going to try it next week; my standards are above. Give it a whirl 😀

Great advice I needed

Great advice I needed

Really quick post, just wanted to share what I’m totally going to do from now on.

“You could call it my own version of “The Price is Right”. If I see something I want to impulse purchase, I think of a price I would be happy to pay for it. If I check the actual price and it’s lower, I buy it. If the price is higher, I walk away.”

I AM GOING TO SAVE SO MUCH MONEY.

 

Since I don’t wear rings…

Since I don’t wear rings…

When I get married, I want this. I’m not all that into sparkles at all so diamonds just don’t hold appeal for me. On the other hand, The Box is all of the metaphor and symbolism and emotion-triggering that I would want in a sentimental gift from someone I would want to be with forever. Every scent would be a reminder of a moment we had or would have together. Plus, with so many scents, I likely won’t run out of them before I can pass it to my child and explain to them mommy’s weird obsession with smelly things!

This isn’t the only collection that would make me happy. There are so many awesome fragrance blends and single accords out there that any small collection would likely get me excited. Smell is one of the slowest-processing memories we make, it lasts longer. Any scent that makes an emotional impact sticks with you. I don’t think that many people can say the same about a sparkle.

Unfortunately for me, and the guy whom I may marry one day, it’s really expensive. More expensive than a lot of rings for sure. If it was a wedding present from my parents or a bunch of friends pooled together for it, that would be alright too, heh 😀 *winknudge*

(Also, you can totally get me gift certificates in the meantime :D…)

Do me a favor

Do me a favor

That’s so interesting! Definitely a tactic I’ll try to use from now on. It sounds counter-intuitive but it makes sense when you break it down. A person is more likely to do a favor for someone they like after all; this is just application in reverse. Ben Franklin, once again, proven awesome.

However, I’m wondering if it has the same effect if there’s a power disparity. I like my boss, but if I didn’t and she asked me to do her a favor, I would do it anyway, and probably come out of it feeling the same way towards her. I used to do quite a few favors for people in fast food/restaurant/take-out situations because much of the time, the situation seemed to really call for me to say “yes”, and not all of them increased my affinity towards them. In fact, if they caught me in a poor mood, it would likely degrade my relationship with the asker if we started off neutral, or if I felt I was being handed an unjust responsibility.

Anyway, Ben Franklin Effect!

How to Fail

How to Fail

Forbes used a different title, but I like the one in the URL better.

Perhaps this article covers more than just trust in work and school and things we’re assigned to do. The author uses an anecdote of desert survival practice in the military. I don’t think it’s only the military that needs to be told they can still fail as a whole even when one of their guys comes out on top.

This is a video they included in the article. I’m at work right now, but I’m sure they included it for a reason. Be sure to check it out like i will later!

How we all miss the point on school shootings

How we all miss the point on school shootings

How We All Miss the Point on School Shootings

But this “witch hunt” we go through every time a school shooting happens is a total ruse. Elliot Rodger didn’t become a killer because he was a misogynist; he became a misogynist because he was a killer. Just like Eric Harris didn’t become a killer because he loved violent video games; he loved violent video games because he was a killer. Just like Adam Lanza didn’t become a killer because he loved guns; he loved guns because he was a killer.

Not going to lie, while I enjoyed this editorial and I resonate with many of its ideas, the solution he proposes is so, so much easier said than done. Most of us have grown up shutting out those in pain because there were just so many of those in pain that it would put us in suffering to even acknowledge all of them. Or at the very least, that’s what we were told by those guiding us through life. That you can’t help everybody. That you can’t touch everyone. If someone shoots up a school, goes on a stabbing, commits suicide, then ultimately, that was on them.

I’m reminded of “Riley Rewind”, which was a webseries written and directed by Ray William Johnson and Anna Akana.

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